Homeschooling Myths

There are many myths surrounding homeschooling and its effectiveness. We hope to dispell some of those here...

 

Homeschooling only occurs at home.

Home is, indeed, the foundation for learning, where the student begins to receive the necessary rock-solid confidence to excel. Yet, homeschooling is far from confined to the home. There are classes and education co-ops available to attend, along with clubs and sports to join, plus a host of other activities that promote interaction and synergy among homeschool students and families.

 

Homeschooling requires daylong devotion.

While homeschooling requires time and devotion, the education can be safe, sincere, nurturing and highly effective without requiring an unyielding burden on the parents or child. The “One House on the Prairie” perception, although still possible and effective, doesn't reflect today's reality. Busy single parents, in fact, are homeschooling their children, as are fathers. Also, struggling learners and children who learn differently are succeeding academically, often better than their counterparts in public schools.

 

Parents without a strong academic background cannot teach their children.

Parents and students effectively learn together. Parents need only an enthusiasm for learning along with a commitment to make the effort. Statistics show that a parent's level of education has no influence on how well their children do in home education. By virtue of grade-specific online resources, DVDs, local support groups like RCHSA, certified teachers, and homeschool classes/co-ops, ample assistance is available.

 

Homeschool students lack social skills.

Quite the opposite is true. Widespread national studies find that homeschool children are better socialized than students from public and private schools. Having children at home, where the family can be their major influence rather than peers, socialization becomes overwhelmingly positive. Add the fact that there are plenty of opportunities for homeschool children to interact with one another and the myth of poor socialization is easily dispelled.

 

Homeschooling is not the place for struggling learners or children who have difficulty learning?

Children who learn differently make up a steadily increasing segment of the homeschool population, as is the case with special needs' children. While traditional schools are set up to service the needs of the general public, or the masses, home education can be tailored to personalize the learning process. Simply, compare a class of five struggling learners to a homeschool class of one that also has the benefit of focused dedication and numerous support resources.

 

Homeschool doesn't prepare students for college.

Yes, it does. And quite effectively. Major universities now actually reserve a certain percentage of their enrollment solely for homeschoolers, because they know those students know how to study and are typically more self disciplined and well rounded than their counterparts in public school. On the college-entrance Scholastic Achievement Test (SAT), homeschoolers score 67 points above the national average, and homeschoolers outperform all other students on the ACT (American College Testing). Further, 68 percent of U.S. universities now accept parent-prepared transcripts.

 

Homeschooling harms public schools.

While schools are allocated money from the government based on their enrollment figures, the difference lost from the non-attending homeschooling students is offset by the school not having to spend money on those students. Also, homeschooling families pay taxes that support the school system, even though they aren't utilizing the school's resources. Additionally, an argument can be made that the homeschoolers are helping the school by reducing the number of children attending that school and, thus, lowering the classroom-to-teacher ratio.

 

Homeschooling parents think their children are too good for public school.

This criticism often arises from a feeling of defensiveness on the part of public school parents. Many of those same people would like to homeschool their children, but find it impossible to do so because of economics, social stigmas, low confidence in their own ability to teach their children, and lack of free time. Actually, there is partial truth to this myth. Although homeschooling parents don't think their children are better than their public school peers, they do believe the educational benefits are worth the sacrifice, monetary and otherwise, to give their children what they perceive as a better education.

 

My kids will just sit at home all day.

Homeschooling empowers families to embrace experiential learning and extracurricular activities. This provides the flexibility to take a field trip when it’s convenient or move the classroom to another setting that is relaxing and inspiring. Daily schedules can be created that enable your child to learn at a time and a pace that make the most sense given the realities of your life. By enabling you to determine the months and days your student will receive instruction, homeschooling allows you to create a truly customized school year.

 

My child won’t learn the right things.

One of the primary reasons parents decide to homeschool is because they don't believe the public school system is teaching the right lessons and instilling the proper values. With homeschooling, parents have more control over both curriculum and specific courses. Plus, plenty of guidance is available to help with those choices.

 

I can't quit my job to homeschool

Again, while homeschooling requires time and devotion, the schedule upon when the schooling is done is up to you. Some parents who work during the day homeschool at night. Busy single parents, in fact, are homeschooling their children, as are fathers, aunts and uncles. The best part of homeschooling is it is extremely flexible to meet your individual needs.

Mission Statement

The Rowan County Home School Association is a Christ-centered homeschool support group. We offer our members the opportunity to participate in academic programs and social activities that strengthen and promote traditional family values. Education is a God-given right and the responsibility of parents.

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Verse of the Day

Psalms 56:7 - "Shall they escape by iniquity? in thine anger cast down the people, O God."